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Posts from the ‘Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009)’ Category

27
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Ears of the Elves Review (Part 2 of 2)

We’re approaching the end of our Duels of the Planeswalkers coverage- have we saved the best for last? Ears of the Elves was a standout performer in our review of the original paper decks, will it be the same here?

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25
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Ears of the Elves Review (Part 1 of 2)

Like any large community of people with a common interest but varied values, Magic is no stranger to controversy. Usually these are local issues, such as the reprint policy or card bannings- concerns that are only really relevant to the community itself. Other times, however, they plant their flag firmly within a larger societal context. One of the most visible of these is the issue of sexism in Magic, which one can be forgiven for thinking fluctuates somewhere between boil and simmer.

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23
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Claws of Vengeance Review (Part 2 of 2)

As we discussed in our last article, Ajani underwent a transformation from Ajani Goldmane to Ajani Vengeant when SHards of Alara came around. By a similar measure, I’m looking to transform Claws of Vengeance into a victorious deck, but I’m not without opposition. Standing in my way is Sam, with Chandra’s Breath of Fire.

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21
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Claws of Vengeance Review (Part 1 of 2)

One doesn’t need to be a Magic player for long to recognise the truism that what you start out with isn’t always what you end up with. This is perpetually the case in R&D, where cards, themes, mechanics, and sets can go through all manner of changes before being cemented into the final form you see when you open a booster pack.

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19
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Wings of Light Review (Part 2 of 2)

It’s Elspeth’s turn in the arena, and opposing her this time is Nissa Revane. Joining me at the table is Sam, who’s been eager for a turn at the Black/Green Ears of the Elves. Can Wings of Light rise above?

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17
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Wings of Light Review (Part 1 of 2)

If you went to your local gaming store in Autumn of 2008 and picked up a booster of Shards of Alara, you might have been delightfully surprised to open it up and find a copy of Elspeth, Knight-Errant staring back at you in the rare slot. In your moment of joy at your good fortune, you might well have been forgiven for momentarily overlooking the string of evolution of Magic that brought you to that moment.

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15
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Teeth of the Predator Review (Part 2 of 2)

We’re now reaching the halfway mark of our ongoing Duels of the Planeswalkers coverage, and today we’re headed into battle alongside Garruk Wildspeaker. erving as foil is Jimi, who’s shuffling up Elspeth Tirel’s Wings of Light. Can her heavenly host stop tne encroach of nature, or will she be trampled beneath hoof and paw?

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13
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Teeth of the Predator Review (Part 1 of 2)

Amongst other innovations and changes to the game, the release of Ninth Edition in 2005 marked the end of an era to the White player. This was the first time that the Circle of Protection had been omitted from the core set. Present since the dawn of the game, this five-card cycle had been a staple part of White’s defensive-minded style, but over time their shortcomings became more apparent.

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11
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Thoughts of the Wind Review (Part 2 of 2)

It’s time to put the most expensive planeswalker to the test- or, really, the deck based upon him. Joining me at the table is Sam, who has grabbed the copy of the Naya-themed Claws of Vengeance. Can Jace think his way out of this latest bind?

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9
Dec

Duels of the Planeswalkers (2009): Thoughts of the Wind Review (Part 1 of 2)

Some things just happen to feel ‘right.’ Consider, for instance, the “classical” four elements: air, earth, fire, and water. Although modern science has presented us with a glorious, periodic table of over a hundred of them, the notion of the four elements has persisted. A look at the notion’s history reveals a remarkable perseverance that has transcended time and place. Plato ascribed the association to a Sicilian philosopher, Empedocles, around 450 BC, and this may have descended from the earlier Babylonians and their epic of creation, the Enuma Elish. Interestingly, the Babylonians themselves saw five elements, splitting “air” into “wind” and “sky.” Around a century later, Aristotle would ‘restore’ a fifth element to the mix, aether, the stuff of the stars and heavens.

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