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Posts from the ‘Other Games’ Category

8
Nov
Bull Rush

Kaijudo Dojo Edition: Bull Rush Review (Part 2 of 2)

We’re back with the other half of Kaijudo Dojo Edition’s Bull Rush deck, putting it through its paces to see how it comes together. By way of oppositin, it’s something of a mirror match today as Sam has selected Tatsurion’s deck from the first precon set to act as oppistion. In the battle of the Nature/Fire decks, is it new and improved to carry the day, or will the old school be teaching all of the day’s lessons? Stick around for the end- we have an update to the Kaijudo booster giveaway!

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4
Nov
Om Nom Nom

Kaijudo Dojo Edition: Bull Rush Review (Part 1 of 2)

True story. Last May, the Ertai’s Lament team headed down the pike to Louisville to check out the Star City Games Open. For Jimi and Sam, this was the first time they’d ever been to a large Magic event, and while we weren’t there to play in the tournament, we did want to take in some side events, browse the merchants, and just have a good time. Off to the side in the far corner of the room was a table set up for the live stream commentators, and at one point when circling about we found two gentlemen there having a discussion.

“Look, Sam,” I said, pointing them out, “Magic pros.”

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3
Nov
Kaijudo logo

Win a Trio of Kaijudo Dojo Edition Boosters!

That’s right, it’s another giveaway! We’ve got a draft set of Kaijudo Dojo Editions laying about, and we’d love to send them to a good home. Could it be yours?

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19
Aug
Dream Pirate

Battle Decks- Tatsurion vs Razorkinder: Razorkinder’s Deck Review (Part 2 of 2)

It’s the rubber match for the new Kaijudo Battle Deck, and this time I’m piloting Razorkinder’s 40 cards. With options to lock down and control the battlefield, I’m much more at home. Of course, so is Sam, since Tatsurion’s deck is smash-and-grab aggro that abandons defense in favour of furious aggression!

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11
Aug
Tatsurion_show

Battle Decks- Tatsurion vs Razorkinder: Tatsurion’s Deck Review (Part 2 of 2)

Having now reviewed both of the Battle Decks on their own, it’s time to pit them up against one another and see if Tatsurion’s deck can deliver! Serving as opposition is Sam, who’s shuffling up Razorkinder’s collection of 40. Here are the notes from our clash.

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5
Aug
Razorkinder

Battle Decks- Tatsurion vs Razorkinder: Razorkinder’s Deck Review (Part 1 of 2)

One of the most intriguing differences between Magic and Kaijudo comes in the realm of combat. Magic’s combat is wave-based. To attack, you send your army screaming and charging en masse, presenting a puzzle for your opponent who then has to determine if/how to allocate their defensive options. Barring a Relentless Assault-type effect, you have one shot at it then you’re done. Other games like World of Warcraft and Kaijudo tend to simulate a more individually driven approach. Your attackers each get their moment to impact the flow of the game. As we’ll see today with Razorkinder’s deck, that opens up a whole new swath of design space.

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31
Jul
Tatsurion

Battle Decks- Tatsurion vs Razorkinder: Tatsurion’s Deck Review (Part 1 of 2)

“I believe one of Richard Garfield’s most innovative creations when he made the game of Magic,” once wrote Magic head designer Mark Rosewater, “was the color wheel. The color wheel is the one thing that ties together all the flavor and mechanical aspects of the game. To me, it is the heart of Magic.” Indeed for all that the game of Magic: the Gathering has changed over time, one of the few absolute constants has been the colours of Magic. After all, why mess with a winning formula?

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29
Jul
Kaijudo logo

A Planeswalker’s Guide to Kaijudo

In the aftermath of the immediate success of Magic: the Gathering in 1993, a number of other Collectible Card Games (CCG’s) hit the market in an attempt to capitalise on the burgeoning interest in the medium. Up until then there had certainly been card games found in the gaming market, but these tended towards what is known as the Limited Card Game (LCG) model- buy a game, and you get all the game’s cards. It was one of creator Richard Garfield’s enduring contributions to the genre that he crafted a game that drew its inspiration from the sports card market- booster packs that had only a small quantity of the available cards. Clearly, the formula worked.

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